Sergey Oboguev (oboguev) wrote,
Sergey Oboguev
oboguev

The Germans were meticulous in keeping records of every meeting and
conversation. And the Soviets were fortunate in capturing these records from the
Reichstag, the German Foreign Ministry, and many other sources. One such source
was Herbert von Dirksen, the German Ambassador to Britain 1938-1939. Von Dirksen
did a very careless thing for a diplomat in keeping secret documents and records
at home. The Soviet army in 1945 discovered von Dirksen's private papers in his
estate at Groeditsberg in Germany. Among his papers were typed copies of his
messages from London and messages of the German Foreign Ministry, and secret
talks involving Sir Horace Wilson and Robert Hudson and von Dirksen and
Goering's economics advisor Helmuth Wohlthat. Dirksen's papers show that even at
this late hour, the British Government proposed an agreement with Hitler:

Goering's US educated economist Helmuth Wohlthat met Horace Wilson in July and
August 1939 to discuss Anglo-German cooperation and a non-aggression pact:

"Herr Wohlthat [the name is crossed out and Wilson is written on the original
document] suggested as the general objective a broad Anglo-German agreement
on all major questions, as had been originally envisaged by the Fuhrer... Sir
Horace Wilson definitely told Herr Wohlthat that the conclusion of a non-aggression
pact would enable Britain to rid herself of her commitments
vis-a-vis Poland."

(Von Dirksen, in a memorandum to the German Foreign Ministry, July 20 1939.) (1)

"There were still three big regions in the world where Germany and England could
find wide opportunities for activity: the British Empire, China and Russia.
England alone could not adequately take care of her vast empire and it would be
quite possible for Germany to be given a rather comprehensive share."

(Robert Hudson to Wohlthat, July 20 1939.) (2)

"The Fuhrer had only to take a sheet of paper and jot down his points; the
British Government would be prepared to discuss them."

(Sir Horace Wilson to Wohlthat, July 20 1939.) (3)

"Agreement with Germany is still Britain's dearest aim."

(Herbert von Dirksen's dispatch to Berlin, July 24 1939.) (4)

"Sir Horace Wilson confirmed that he had suggested to Herr Wohlthat the
following program of negotiations:

1) Conclusion of a treaty of "non-aggression,"...

...he [Wilson] replied that an Anglo-German agreement... vis-a-vis third
Powers would completely absolve the British Government from the commitments to
which it was now pledged by the guarantees of Poland..."

4) Negotiations regarding Germany's economic interests in the Southeast.

5) Negotiations regarding raw materials. Sir Horace Wilson stressed that this
was to include the colonial question...

6) A non-intervention agreement... The English side would be prepared to make a
declaration of non-intervention in respect to Greater Germany (Greater Reich)."

(Minute of a Conversation between von Dirksen and Sir Horace Wilson, Aug 3
1939.) (5)

"After Wohlthat's visit to London Hitler is convinced that in the event of a
conflict England will remain neutral."

(German Air Attache in Poland, Gerstenberg, in a note of Aug 7 1939.) (6)

(1)See:"Documents and Materials Relating to the Eve of the Second World War,
Vol.II, Dirksen Papers. 1938-1939." Foreign Languages Publishing House. Moscow
1948.

(2)See:"Documents and Materials Relating to the Eve of the Second World War,
Vol.II, Dirksen Papers. 1938-1939." Foreign Languages Publishing House. Moscow
1948.

(3)See:"Documents and Materials Relating to the Eve of the Second World War,
Vol.II, Dirksen Papers. 1938-1939." Foreign Languages Publishing House. Moscow
1948.

(4)See:"Documents and Materials Relating to the Eve of the Second World War,
Vol.II, Dirksen Papers. 1938-1939." Foreign Languages Publishing House. Moscow
1948.

(5)See:"Documents and Materials Relating to the Eve of the Second World War,
Vol.II, Dirksen Papers. 1938-1939." Foreign Languages Publishing House. Moscow
1948.

(6)See:"On the Eve of World War II 1933-1939." Novosti. Moscow 1974.

"Public opinion is so inflamed... that if these plans of negotiations with
Germany were to become public they would immediately become torpedoed."

(Von Dirksen's message to Berlin, July 24 1939.) (1)

"If anything about them [the negotiations] were to leak out there would be
a great scandal, and Chamberlain would probably be forced to resign."

(Horace Wilson to von Dirksen, Aug 3 1939.) (2)

. . . . . .

Britain had effectively signed a non-aggression pact with Germany in September
1938 when it signed the the Munich agreement. France signed a similar pact with
Germany in December 1938. Frenchmen named Lavalle "the grave digger of France".

"Leave us our colonial empire and we'll let you have the Ukraine."

(French minister Bonnet to Ribbentrop.)

. . . . . .

On the day Hitler entered Prague the Federation of British Industries was
drawing up agreements with German big business Reichsgruppe Industrie in
Dusseldorf. In July it was revealed that the British Parliamentary Secretary to
the Board of Trade Robert Hudson had been with Hitler's Economics Minister
Helmuth Wohlthat to negotiate a £1,000,000,000 loan to Nazi Germany. (3)

(3)See:Koni Zilliacus "Can the Tories Win the Peace? And How They Lost the Last
One." Victor Gollancz. London 1945.
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